Making pasta from scratch

Have you ever tried it? All you need are eggs and flour. It’s more time consuming than buying dried pasta, for sure, but a fun meal to make with the family.

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When the kids were little I made pasta for them - I took 1 egg out of the recipe and replaced it with 1/2 cup of pureed vegetables so they had different coloured pasta

We have a Kitchenaid stand mixer with the pasta roller attachment. Way easy to make noodles with that. Before that it was roll out the pasta with a rolling pin, roll it up, slice off rounds, then unroll the noodles.

We just finished some chicken noodle soup. To make the noodles, we started with chicken broth, (a scant quarter cup?) added some powdered sage, pepper and salt. Added an egg. Mixed it all up and then added flour until it was a stiff dough. That was with the flat paddle on the Kitchenaid. Then rolled it out with the noodle maker, then ran it through the noodle cutter. No need to dry it or anything, just tossed it in the broth & veggies.

Noodles made with the noodle maker are much closer to store bought noodles. The big fat floury home made noodles pretty much need to be made by hand to get them fat enough.

With chicken broth?! Interesting!

Oh sure. Water is a pretty boring liquid and since I was making noodles for the chicken soup that was sitting there waiting for the noodles, it was easy enough to scoop some bone broth out of the soup pot. It was closer than water from the tap, actually. Guess I’m a lazy cook.

Bone broth is stone easy to make. Eat the roast chicken, spare ribs, whatever has the bones. Toss them in a soup pot, cover with water and bring to a boil. Roasting or browning the bones in a pan with a bit of oil first increases the flavor. Usually a few leaves get added in at the start. Bay laurel leaves or kaffir lime, depends on which smells better with the rest of the soup pot contents. Simmer til it smells good, then cool and remove the bones.

Since noodles or pasta is a pretty large part of whatever recipe is being made, instead of using the sauce or whatever else is there to add flavor to the pasta, by putting flavors into the pasta itself, the sauce doesn’t have to work so hard.

That sounds like fun! Did the veggies improve the flavor of the noodles very much?

Hmm, I don’t usually make noodles and then dry them, but it might be fun to make a bigger batch of noodles than is needed at the moment and dry some. A different color and flavor of noodle could be made each time and then with the dried extras there’d be a supply of different fun noodles on hand.

Hmm, how could this be done so it would easily result in three colors of noodles? Put the liquid, egg and spices together, then separate it into thirds? Hmm, if the different colors had different spices, then they’d be added later. Then add one of the three pureed veggies with one third of the liquid and make the dough, then repeat two more times to make the other doughs.

After the three colors of dough were made, then they could be rolled and cut out into noodles or pasta as usual. This could be fun! Thanks!

I never dried the pasta noodles. I would make nests on a cookie sheet and freeze them. Once they were frozen I would bag them. Then when I wanted some I could just take so many nests out of the bag and cook them. I would spend the day making different batches so I could freeze a few different colours at a time. The veggies never altered he taste of the pasta. My girls didn[t know there was vegetables in the noodles until they grew up.

Which were the best veggies? I see spinach pasta at the grocery and occasionally tomato pasta as well. Pumpkin might be fun?

I always like adding flavors when possible, perhaps roasted veggies would add flavor as well as color. Roasted onion or garlic chopped fine and added to the noodles may be tasty, but wouldn’t add color unless it was red onions.

Do you make special noodles to go with certain recipes? I’ll usually always add sage to noodles for chicken soup.